Subjects

Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic

The history and culture of Anglo-Saxon England, Celtic languages and literature, or Viking exploits – Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic (ASNC) allows you to explore a range of cultures, and to look at history, language and literature side by side. ASNC focuses on the history, material culture, languages and literature of the peoples of Britain, Ireland and the Scandinavian world in the earlier Middle Ages.

No previous knowledge of the subject is expected or required; all languages are taught from scratch and we don’t assume that students have studied early medieval history or literature at school. However, we do require passion and commitment and look for evidence of your general ability in arts and humanities subjects.

Archaeology

The Archaeology course encompasses Archaeology, Assyriology, Egyptology and Biological Anthropology. Archaeology uses material evidence to explore the nature and development of particular societies and to explain the variations and commonalities of the human past. Assyriology is the study of the languages, cultures, history and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia (Sumer, Babylonia and Assyria). Egyptology is the study of the history, languages, society, archaeology and religion of ancient Egypt. Biological Anthropology explores human evolution, biology and behaviour, and the interaction between biology and culture.

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

Within the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (AMES) course, the area we study stretches from Japan in the East to Morocco in the West, and from classical times to the present day. To study one of these cultures through its language is not only to develop a set of practical skills and knowledge that can be used later in many different ways, but also to engage with different ways of understanding our shared world. Languages on offer include Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Persian, Hebrew and Aramaic.

Chemical Engineering

The course concentrates on the scientific principles that underpin modern chemical and biochemical engineering. The aim is to produce graduates that meet the needs of today’s process industries by providing a thorough understanding of the subject, technical competence, and transferable skills. The underlying theory is complemented by a series of lectures and projects that teach process design and chemical product design. The course is supported by a consortium of 10 industrial companies which provide input on content and assist with teaching. These links also mean that there are opportunities for vacation placements with some of the world’s top companies.

Chemical engineers spend their first year studying either Engineering or Natural Sciences. These routes provide equally good preparation for becoming a chemical engineer, and are taken up by a similar number of students.

Classics

The Classics course encompasses the history, culture, archaeology, art, philosophy and linguistics of classical antiquity and the study of original texts and artefacts. You can either specialise in a particular field or retain the breadth with which the course starts. The Faculty’s facilities include a well-stocked library and our own Museum of Classical Archaeology. In addition, you have access to the holdings of the Fitzwilliam Museum, where some classes take place.

There is a three-year course for those with an A-level or equivalent in Latin. Additionally, there is also a four year course for those without Latin; an aptitude for language learning is required. It is also possible for those with an honours degree to apply for entry as an Affiliated Student

Computer Science

The course is broad and deep – giving skills to create future technology. All aspects of modern computer science are covered, along with the underlying theory and foundations in economics, law and business. You also develop practical skills, such as programming (in various languages, eg ML, Java, C/C++, Prolog) and hardware systems (eg chip design using Verilog).

Economics

The course provides a sound understanding of core, pure and applied economics. However, while you study economics in considerable depth in this specialised degree, you employ ideas and techniques from many other disciplines too; including history, sociology, mathematics and statistics, and politics.

Education


The course at Cambridge is a rigorous and rewarding interdisciplinary degree. You follow one of three tracks, combining in-depth study of a particular field of interest with an examination of wider educational and social issues. The Education, Psychology and Learning track focuses on education from a psychological perspective; exploring human development and education in a variety of social and cultural environments. In Education, Policy and International Development you consider historical and contemporary discussions concerning these areas, and education’s role in economic and social change. Education, English, Drama and the Arts combines the study of drama and/or English literature with key issues in education, such as debates around creativity, learning and culture.

Engineering

The Cambridge Engineering course is unique. It allows you to keep your options open while equipping you with all the analytical, design and computing skills that underpin modern engineering practice. Part I (Years 1 and 2) provides a broad education in engineering fundamentals, enabling you to make a genuinely informed choice about the area in which to specialise from your third year. Part II (Years 3 and 4) then provides in-depth training in your chosen professional discipline.

English


Over the centuries, many writers have studied in Cambridge: Spenser, Marlowe, Milton, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Tennyson, Forster, Plath, Hughes, Byatt and Zadie Smith. When established, the Cambridge course was considered daringly innovative and this ethos continues to shape teaching and research. Today’s course balances a strong grounding in the core of English literature with the chance to explore literature from around the world, other art forms, the English language, and related intellectual traditions.

Hughes Hall also welcomes applicants with a suitable three-year degree who would like to be considered for entry as an Affiliated Student.

Geography

All societies rely on relationships with each other and the physical environment. Increasingly these are fragile interdependences presenting intellectual and practical challenges. The Geography course tackles these issues from a broad base, but also allows you to specialise.

History


The History degree gives you the opportunity to explore the past from many different angles – including political, economic, social and cultural history – and to explore the interaction between history and other disciplines, such as politics, anthropology and archaeology. There’s ample scope throughout to pursue personal interests and experiment with different historical approaches. Some paper options are shared with other courses, such as Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Classics, and Politics and International Relations and specialist papers allow you to work with a variety of source materials as varied as Hollywood movies and Renaissance art.

History and Modern Languages

The four-year History and Modern Languages degree encompasses intensive study in language, culture, film, the history of political thought and a wide variety of modern British, European, American and world history. Like other language students, you spend the third year abroad – studying or working in a foreign country and immersing yourself in the language, culture and history.

When you graduate, you’ll have near native-speaker skills in your language and a deep knowledge and understanding of the regions in which that language is used. You’ll also have acquired a wider knowledge of European and extra-European history.

History and Politics


This course balances a strong grounding in the two component subjects with the chance to explore the ways in which historical and political understanding together illuminate the modern world. It provides the opportunity to undertake intensive study in political science, the history of political thought, a wide variety of modern British, European, American and world history, conceptual issues in political science, and quantitative methods.

History of Art

The course covers a wide spectrum of art and architecture, from the medieval to modern and contemporary periods. The aim is to foster a wide and deep understanding of art and architecture, and to help you develop visual literacy and awareness, as well as a range of critical and analytical skills.

Human, Social and Political Sciences (HSPS)


Human, Social, and Political Sciences (HSPS) at Cambridge can be tailored from the start. This means it’s suited both to those with specific subject interests and to those looking for a multidisciplinary degree. The course comprises three core disciplines, taught by globally respected departments: Politics and International Relations, Social Anthropology, and Sociology.

Land Economy

Law, economics, and their relationship to the built and natural environments are central to Land Economy, along with other areas such as business regulation, the financial aspects of real estate and international development. The multidisciplinary nature of the course is particularly relevant in the twenty-first century where the environment, law and economics and the control of scarce resources affect the daily lives of people around the world.

Law

Although our course (referred to elsewhere as LLB) is primarily concerned with English law, there are opportunities to study other legal systems, including civil (Roman) law, EU law and international law. You can also study theoretical and sociological aspects of law such as jurisprudence or parts of criminology.

Hughes Hall also welcomes applicants with an appropriate three-year degree who would like to be considered for entry as an Affiliated Student.

Linguistics

Linguistics is the systematic study of human language. Superficially, there’s huge variation among the world’s languages, and linguists not only describe the diverse characteristics of individual languages but also explore properties which all languages share and which offer insight into the human mind. The study of linguistics draws on methods and knowledge from a wide range of disciplines. For instance, the study of meaning draws on philosophy, the analysis of the speech signal uses methods from physics and engineering, and the study of language acquisition draws on psychology.

Mathematics


The Cambridge Mathematics course is often considered to be the most demanding undergraduate Mathematics course available in Britain and, correspondingly, one of the most rewarding.

Two other aspects of the course that our students greatly appreciate are its flexibility and the breadth of subjects offered. The amount of choice increases each year and after Year 1 the workload isn’t fixed so you can choose the number of options you study to suit your own work pattern. Some students take as many options as they can; others take fewer and study them very thoroughly.

Modern & Medieval Languages

The Cambridge course is uniquely flexible and interdisciplinary. You can pursue your interests in many areas – from Italian Renaissance art to contemporary Brazilian cinema, medieval German folk tales to socialist realism in Stalin’s Russia. MML also includes options in linguistics, such as the historical and cognitive dimensions of the languages you’re studying.

Music


Over recent decades many of the most significant figures in British music have studied or taught at Cambridge: composers such as Alexander Goehr, Judith Weir and Thomas Adès; performers like Joanna MacGregor and Thomas Trotter; and conductors including John Eliot Gardiner, Christopher Hogwood and Edward Gardner. Our undergraduate course has a strong academic component, particularly focusing on history, analysis, composition (including screen and media composition) and performance, but also offering a range of other topics.

Natural Sciences

Natural Sciences (NST) offers a wide range of physical and biological science subjects from 16 departments in a unique and demanding course. A broad first year is combined with increasing specialisation in the second year and the possibility of total specialisation in the third year. The breadth of the course reflects the blurring of boundaries between the different sciences and before committing yourself to one department you study a variety of subjects, some of which may be new to you. You should indicate whether your interests lie broadly in biological or physical sciences, but this choice isn’t absolute, and many students change direction before they start or as they progress.

In Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, History and Philosophy of Science,
Materials Science and Physics a fourth year is also offered, leading to an Msci degree.

Philosophy


Cambridge occupies a distinguished place in the history of philosophy. It was here, in the early twentieth century, that Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Ramsey and others developed the analytic style of philosophy that is now prominent in much of the world. Today, the Faculty retains a strong commitment to this analytic tradition, combining it with study of the history of philosophy from Plato to the present day to offer one of the most far-reaching courses of its kind available anywhere in the world.

Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (PBS)

Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (PBS) at Cambridge gives you the opportunity to study cognitive, social, developmental and biological psychology within the broader context of the behavioural sciences. The course covers, for example, cognitive psychology, psychopathology, language, brain mechanisms, gender, family relationships and influences, personality, and group social behaviour. A wide range of options enable you to study the topics that interest you most in greater depth.

Theology, Religion and Philosophy of Religion

Theology, Religion, and Philosophy of Religion is a broad and demanding degree that addresses fundamental questions through a range of religious traditions and philosophical standpoints. Encompassing the history, practice and thought of the major world religions of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism, the course develops your understanding of the significance of religion and its cultural contexts. You have considerable freedom to create a varied programme of study by exploring a diverse range of topics. Alternatively, you can follow a particular pathway if you wish to specialise in a specific area of interest.